Tag Archives: hearing loss

Obesity causes Hearing Loss

Myth or Medical Miracle?

True!  It is a real risk. A recent study in Laryngoscope, referenced in The New York Times, showed that there is a clear connection between obesity and hearing loss in adolescents.   What doesn’t obesity cause?  Obesity affects 18.5% of American teens and is responsible for $117 billion in medical care yearly in the US alone.

But with well-known connections between obesity and heart disease, diabetes and premature death, this connection to hearing loss is a new bothersome but less life-threatening concern.  Researchers believe that inflammation in the hearing system is the cause for hearing loss.  This inflammation is associated with obesity.  They suggest that as time goes on, hearing loss may progress. Don’t lose hope though! They also believe that early weight loss can prevent the progression.

Dr. Yagoda, an otolarynologist, can evaluate you if you think you are experiencing hearing loss. She can help musicians and others protect their hearing as well.  Come in for a consultation and fuel your body with knowledge to continue hearing life’s music!

Listen Up! Your Headphones Could be Causing Hearing Loss

Did you know approximately 15 percent of Americans ages 20 to 69 have high-frequency hearing loss that may have been caused by loud noise exposure? Frequent exposure to loud sounds can wear down the hair cells of your ear’s cochlea, which can ultimately cause hearing loss or tinnitus (ringing in the ear).

Researchers claim medical and genetic factors play a role, and some people are more at risk than others. However, anything louder than 85 decibels can cause damage after extended exposure. Interestingly, sounds made by household objects such as hair dryers and kitchen blenders can go past 85 decibels. The rule to go by is if you have to raise your voice to be able talk to someone an arm’s length away. If this is the case, the nose is probably above 85 decibels.

When you consistently listen to your headphones at a high volume, you risk doing permanent damage. The good news is you can take steps now to prevent noise-induced hearing loss in the future.